Category: Materials

We can lighten heavy metals to the point that they are transported by a simple mosquito

Ultra-low density foams are not foams in the traditional sense of the term, but a spaghetti-like network of nanometric-sized wires randomly connected and containing the same or less number of atoms than air. This technique, achieved at the LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory), allows lightening heavy metals such as gold, silver or copper to the point that they can be mounted on a mosquito.
The world's blackest material is presented in an exhibition at the New York Stock Exchange
The world's blackest material is presented in an exhibition at the New York Stock Exchange
As part of a new exhibition at the New York Stock Exchange, entitled "The Redemption of Vanity," the blackest material in history, conceived by MIT engineers, published the finding in the ACS-Applied Materials magazine. and Interfaces. Specifically, it captures more than 99,995 percent of any incoming light: in other words, it is a material 10 times blacker than anything previously developed.
New metamatarial that changes shape and acquires new properties
New metamatarial that changes shape and acquires new properties
While most reconfigurable materials can alternate between two different states, this newly developed type of nano-architectural metamaterial has the ability to change shape in an adjustable way, adjusting its physical properties as appropriate. Developed by a joint team of Caltech-Georgia Tech-ETH Zurich in the laboratory of Julia R.
New material to avoid mosquitoes: graphene coated clothing
New material to avoid mosquitoes: graphene coated clothing
The mosquito is the deadliest animal in the world, being responsible for the death of more than 725,000 people every year in front of the 50,000 deaths caused by snakes or just 10 people who kill sharks. All the tools we can use to repel them, then, are few. The last has to do with a new fabric, which is covered with graphene.
These traffic signs change color at night when because they are made of a new material
These traffic signs change color at night when because they are made of a new material
In order to help draw attention to important traffic information when it is dark, with possible benefits for both drivers and pedestrians, a new material causes traffic signs to change color at night. The material, whose details are reflected in a study published in Science Advances, consists of a thin film that reflects the light so that traffic signals could be made that glow brightly and change color at night.
The finest unsupported gold ever created is only two atoms thick
The finest unsupported gold ever created is only two atoms thick
A group of researchers from the University of Leeds has measured the thickness of gold at 0.47 nanometers, a million times thinner than a human nail, or what are approximately two atoms thick, confirming that we are facing gold no finer support ever created. The material is considered 2D because it comprises only two layers of atoms that are on top of each other.
A new material with magnetic properties similar to solid magnets but with liquid characteristics
A new material with magnetic properties similar to solid magnets but with liquid characteristics
Until now exclusively hard and rigid materials can also be soft, thanks to this new technique to produce a kind of "liquid magnets", flexible magnets have been developed through a few drops of magnetic liquid that could provide us with a revolutionary class in the future of printable liquid devices for a variety of applications.
We can lighten heavy metals to the point that they are transported by a simple mosquito
We can lighten heavy metals to the point that they are transported by a simple mosquito
Ultra-low density foams are not foams in the traditional sense of the term, but a spaghetti-like network of nanometric-sized wires randomly connected and containing the same or less number of atoms than air. This technique, achieved at the LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory), allows lightening heavy metals such as gold, silver or copper to the point that they can be mounted on a mosquito.
Reducing energy costs associated with building cooling by up to 50% is possible with this new wood
Reducing energy costs associated with building cooling by up to 50% is possible with this new wood
A 'cooling wood' can reduce the cost of air conditioning a home by 50%, because this new wood-based material, designed by scientists from the universities of Maryland and Colorado, successfully reflects heat or infrared radiation. And the buildings represent more than 40% of the total energy demand in the United States, almost half of which is used for heating and cooling.
Can you do 40 pushups? So your risk of heart disease is significantly lower
Can you do 40 pushups? So your risk of heart disease is significantly lower
Men who can do 40 push-ups in a minute are 96 percent less likely to have cardiovascular disease than those who do less than 10. At the moment these results are not known if they can be extrapolated to women or other age groups. To conduct the study, they focused on 1,100 firefighters with an average age of 39.
A material that can regulate its own temperature has been inspired by the skin of the squid
A material that can regulate its own temperature has been inspired by the skin of the squid
A state-of-the-art adaptive space blanket that offers users the ability to control their temperature has been developed by engineers at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), inspired by the squid's skin design. The team of engineers has thus created, in their own words, "a version with modifiable properties so that the amount of trapped or released heat can be regulated."
Graphene has come up with a tough competitor as a title for the most promising material: borophen
Graphene has come up with a tough competitor as a title for the most promising material: borophen
Stronger and more flexible than graphene, a single atom boron layer could revolutionize sensors, batteries and catalytic chemistry. The so-called borophen is a crystalline allotrope proposed for boron. Borophen has a structure of hexagonal boron atoms (similar to that of the carbon atoms in graphene), but with an additional boron atom in the center of each hexagon.
This material allows to be invisible to heat sensitive infrared cameras
This material allows to be invisible to heat sensitive infrared cameras
Like Arnold Schwarzenegger in the movie Predator, when he discovers that he can become invisible to the thermal vision of his alien enemy by smearing his body in fresh mud, a new material developed by the Institute of Nanotechnology and Nano-Bionics of Suzhou (SINANO) can hide a hot object from heat sensitive infrared cameras.
The future of clothing: a fabric that cools when we are hot and warms when we are cold
The future of clothing: a fabric that cools when we are hot and warms when we are cold
A new fabric, developed by a team from the University of Maryland, is the first in the world to automatically heat or cool users as needed. The fabric has been developed with fibers made of two different synthetic materials: one that absorbs water and another that repels it.
This aluminum is much stronger and can now be used to make vehicles
This aluminum is much stronger and can now be used to make vehicles
It is almost as strong as steel and with only one third of the weight. The problem with this aluminum alloy, developed in the 1940s, is that it has never been used to make cars. This obstacle has finally been overcome thanks to the tenacity of a group of developers who have discovered how to weld the joints using the technique generally used to assemble body panels or engine parts.
This is the first synthetic material that, as it stretches, gains thickness
This is the first synthetic material that, as it stretches, gains thickness
There are materials in nature that exhibit these capacities, called auxhetics, such as cat skin, the protective layer in the shells of mussels and tendons in the human body, but it is the first time that a synthetic material with these properties is created , that is, it becomes thicker, at the molecular level, as it stretches.
This hydrogel naturally adheres to cartilage and meniscus and could heal damaged areas
This hydrogel naturally adheres to cartilage and meniscus and could heal damaged areas
Researchers at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne developed a hydrogel, composed of almost 90% water, which naturally adheres to soft tissues such as cartilage and meniscus. If the hydrogel carries repair cells, it could help heal damaged tissue. The research has been published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.
Carbon fiber can store energy in the body of a car
Carbon fiber can store energy in the body of a car
A study led by the Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has shown that carbon fiber can function as battery electrodes, storing energy directly. As a battery Joining graphite filaments in a fiber whose sheets had extraordinary hardness and rigidity, carbon fiber was manufactured for the first time in history.
A new quantum material will change our smartphones
A new quantum material will change our smartphones
Ytterbium dodecaboride, or YbB12, shows a much more efficient conductivity than silicon. In fact, this new "quantum material" could change our smartphones, making them faster and lighter. YbB12 YbB12 is a very clean glass that is unusual since it shares the properties of conductors and insulators: its interior is an insulator and does not conduct electricity, while its surface is extraordinarily efficient for the conduction of electricity.
It is possible to print in 3D a prototype of 'bionic eye'
It is possible to print in 3D a prototype of 'bionic eye'
A team of researchers from the University of Minnesota has printed, for the first time in 3D, a series of light receptors on a hemispherical surface. This discovery marks a significant step towards the creation of a "bionic eye" that could one day help blind people see or sighted people see better.
This new material material changes shape thanks to light and temperature stimuli
This new material material changes shape thanks to light and temperature stimuli
Unlike other similar materials, this one developed by engineers from the University of Colorado at Boulder achieves easily programmable bi-directional transformations at the macroscopic level. So it can be transformed into complex and preprogrammed forms through light and temperature stimuli.