Category: Books that inspire us

Books that inspire us: 'The information' by James Gleick

We are reaching such excess information that new tools are needed to manage and rank it. Of all this, as well as the origins of the information, of the first attempts to compute it, of the most relevant people in the world of information from all eras (from Claude Shannon to Charles Babbage) this scholarly book is always a finalist in the James Gleick Pulitzer Prize: Information.
Books that inspire us: 'The world is going much better than you think!' by Jacques Lecompte
Books that inspire us: 'The world is going much better than you think!' by Jacques Lecompte
Although the media often highlight the half-empty glass (and even empty it a little more than it is true to sell), fortunately there are more and more books that try to balance the faithful of the balance in all areas , from the environment to violence. In the line of works like Factfulness, by Hans Rosling, or In Defense of the Enlightenment, by Steven Pinker, we have this. The world is going much better than you think!
Books that inspire us: 'Hello world. How to remain human in the era of algorithms' by Hannah Fry
Books that inspire us: 'Hello world. How to remain human in the era of algorithms' by Hannah Fry
The main message we can extract from Hello world. How to remain human in the era of the algorithms is that the algorithms are not the holy grail, nor should we demonize them. Hannah Fry has tried to present these sets of computer instructions in the most equitable way: they turn out to be much more competent than human brains in innumerable tasks, but not in all.
Books that inspire us: 'Causas natural', by Barbara Ehrenreich
Books that inspire us: 'Causas natural', by Barbara Ehrenreich
Barbara Ehrenreich, biologist and doctor in Cellular Immunology, had an epiphany when she had to undergo mammography and other certainly invasive diagnostic tests: was she not so vigilant of her health that she could suffer a case of overdiagnosis? Or even more: perhaps life was not trying to do all the things we want to live longer but to take advantage of the short period of time we are here to do more things we want?
Books that inspire us: 'The Mad Scientist' by Luigi Garlaschelli and Alessandra Carrer
Books that inspire us: 'The Mad Scientist' by Luigi Garlaschelli and Alessandra Carrer
Both the cinema and popular culture in general have enthroned the archetypal figure of the scientist as that of a clueless guy with the hair shot towards all the cardinal points of the world, in the best case, or as a mad doctor with nods to destroy The world, at worst. Spurred by Frankenstein's syndrome, a certain postmodernist tufo and a reverential terror of playing gods, then the idea we have now of a scientist is that of a "mad scientist."
Books that inspire us: 'Erring is useful' by Henning Beck
Books that inspire us: 'Erring is useful' by Henning Beck
Our brain is prone to malfunction after a bruise or even a minimal rise in temperature. However, its normal operation is also not for firing rockets. This, in addition to being a demerit, can also be an advantage. For example, prejudices are bad, but they avoid us having to evaluate millions of data that would leave us paralyzed.
Books that inspire us: 'Humans', by Tom Phillips
Books that inspire us: 'Humans', by Tom Phillips
Tom Phillips has been dedicated in Humans to highlight all the errors of the human being, both design and thought, passing through historical and other errors, to show that some errors can even bear important fruits (such as agriculture development).
Books that inspire us: 'The loneliness of the vulnerable country', by Florentino Rodao
Books that inspire us: 'The loneliness of the vulnerable country', by Florentino Rodao
Japan is the closest thing to an extraterrestrial planet. It is like entering the daily life of a lost tribe to give an advanced anthropology class. But all that without dispensing with a Starbucks. That is, without leaving the First World. But Japan was not always like that. In fact, it was in the wake of World War II where he acquired a large part of the characteristics that we now recognize as idiosyncratic: obsession with technology, love for gastronomy, etc.
Books that inspire us: 'That explains it all', by John Brockman
Books that inspire us: 'That explains it all', by John Brockman
How difficult it is to choose the most round idea, concept or adage, which encompasses a greater amount of explanation and clarification. And even more difficult it is to choose it according to its extension, being the smaller extension better than the great extension. What idea to choose? And, above all, how to summarize it so that it does not look like a prayer of a paremiology addict, a cheap aphorism, or a typical message of a fortune cookie.
Books that inspire us: 'Origins' by Lewis Dartnell
Books that inspire us: 'Origins' by Lewis Dartnell
"The water of our body once flowed down Nile, fell like monsoon rain over India and swirled around the Pacific. The carbon present in the organic molecules of our cells was extracted from the atmosphere by plants we eat. Salt from our sweat and our tears, the calcium in our bones and the iron in our blood arose from erosion of the rocks of the earth's crust, and the sulfur of the protein molecules present in our hair and our muscles was expelled by volcanoes. "
Books that inspire us: 'Experiments of improbable science' by Pierre Barthélémy
Books that inspire us: 'Experiments of improbable science' by Pierre Barthélémy
A few years ago we were reviewing here Chronicles of improbable science, a book that we had loved, so it was inevitable to review the last of Pierre Barthélémy, Experiments of improbable science, a sort of second part with more crazy and border studies with pseudoscience. Worthy of receiving all of them some Ignobel prize, this list of experiments described in chapters of just two or three pages each give to smile, but also to learn something along the way.
Books that inspire us: 'On fire. How cooking made us human 'by Richard Wrangham
Books that inspire us: 'On fire. How cooking made us human 'by Richard Wrangham
It can take five or six hours for chimpanzees to chew and digest their food. It is what happens with many mammals. However, humans can cook. Pre-digest food in an oven or a pan. The energy that our ancestors saved in digestion, thanks to the discovery of fire, was used evolutionarily to feed an expanding brain.
Books that inspire us: 'Prohibit the apple and find the snake', by A Straight White Uncle and Leyre Khyal
Books that inspire us: 'Prohibit the apple and find the snake', by A Straight White Uncle and Leyre Khyal
During World War II, historian Barthold Georg Niebuhr wrote that the group is used to being more arrogant, hypocritical, self-centered and relentless in the pursuit of its objectives than the individual. Therefore, every time a group raises any set of ideas, we have to get defensive, much more than if a single thinker does.
Books that inspire us: "The sense of style" by Steven Pinker
Books that inspire us: "The sense of style" by Steven Pinker
In Xataka science we consume everything produced by Steven Pinker, Professor of the Department of Psychology at Harvard University, due to his lucid research on cognition, social relations, psycholinguistics and even, as is the case, what it means to write Well, with style, and why the ideas that language is degenerating or that we write worse each time are just unfounded ideas.
Books that inspire us: 'Factfulness', by Hans Rosling
Books that inspire us: 'Factfulness', by Hans Rosling
There are fewer and fewer homicides (in Spain only 300 a year, when there are tens of thousands of people who die simply from accidental falls). There are fewer and fewer extreme poor (about 140,000 less every day that passes). Every time we pollute less (be careful, we have to tell the people we are: a person of the Iron Age polluted more than a current person).
Books that inspire us: 'Life 3.0' by Max Tegmark
Books that inspire us: 'Life 3.0' by Max Tegmark
Life 3.0: What it means to be human in the era of artificial intelligence addresses the immediate future that awaits us in various fields, such as work, justice, crime or war, with the participation of artificial intelligence algorithms. For this, the author, Max Tegmark, resorts to a trimester division of life: the 1.
Books that inspire us: 'Why does space smell like barbecue', by Tim Peake
Books that inspire us: 'Why does space smell like barbecue', by Tim Peake
Beyond the epic of space travel and the feeling of being surrounded by a myriad of stars, the most unknown aspects of astronauts are simply the most everyday aspects of their existence. That's what astronomer Tim Peake tries to answer in his recent book Why does space smell like barbecue?
Books that inspire us: 'From the myth to the laboratory' by Daniel Torregrosa
Books that inspire us: 'From the myth to the laboratory' by Daniel Torregrosa
When Stalin decided to attack Finland to appropriate territories that allowed him to defend Leningrad against a probable future confrontation with Hitler, a large-scale campaign was conceived that should not extend beyond two weeks. The confrontation with the Nordic country, however, lasted three and a half months and cost the life of between 230.
Books that inspire us: 'Testosterone Rex', by Cordelia Fine
Books that inspire us: 'Testosterone Rex', by Cordelia Fine
The main thesis of this book, Testosterone Rex, can be summarized as follows: there are no innate biological differences between men and women. And, if any, they are so subtle and contextual, that they are unimportant. For those of us who subscribe to the criticism of the rasa table (masterfully defended by Steven Pinker in his book The Rasa Table), this approach may be, a priori, indigestible.
Books that inspire us: 'An elevator to space', by Kelly and Zach Weinersmith
Books that inspire us: 'An elevator to space', by Kelly and Zach Weinersmith
Can you book a "home" book? Yes you can. Because reading it you feel at home. Because their authors look like your colleagues. Because you like the cooing of prose, like that relaxing sway of a long-distance train. The Orient Express would be fine. This is one of the sensations transmitted to me by the latest scientific novelty of the Blackie Books publishing house: An elevator to space.
Books that inspire us: "The last breath of César", by Sam Kean
Books that inspire us: "The last breath of César", by Sam Kean
It is not the first time that we alluded to the book of the extraordinary popularizer Sam Kean in these parts. We saw it with the dwindling spoon and also with the violinist's thumb. His prose, and especially his way of bashing stories by connecting knowledge from various disciplines, is fresh, close and hypnotic.